Last edited by Goltirr
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in South Florida found in the catalog.

comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in South Florida

David S. Maehr

comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in South Florida

by David S. Maehr

  • 293 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville, FL .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bobcat -- Ecology -- Florida,
  • Black bear -- Ecology -- Florida,
  • Florida panther -- Ecology -- Florida

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 161-172).

    StatementDavid Steffen Maehr.
    SeriesBulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History -- v. 40, no. 1
    ContributionsFlorida Museum of Natural History.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination176 p. :
    Number of Pages176
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17226481M

    Trees of the genus Pinushave been dominant species in the southeastern Coastal Plain (SECP) landscape since the Pleistocene (c. 2 million years). When . The comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear and Florida panther in South Florida? Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History. 1.

      The Florida panther is a subspecies of Puma concolor (also known as mountain lion, cougar, or puma) and represents the only known breeding population of puma in the eastern United States. In , the Department of the Interior listed the Florida panther as an endangered subspecies. In this book, Machr summarizes the Florida panther's past, characterizes the ecologi- The comparatiare ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in South Florida. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History 40(1) Created Date.

    The Florida panther was listed in as an "endangered" species under the Endangered Species Act and is protected under the Florida Panther Act of In , a Panther Recovery Team appointed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service prepared a plan to protect the panther and assist in the implementation of its recovery.   In Florida, the bobcat occurs statewide. A solitary, mostly nocturnal creature, the bobcat may live up to 14 years in the wild where it makes its home in swamps and forests. The bobcat may share its habitat with the Florida panther and has often been mistaken for an immature panther.


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Comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in South Florida by David S. Maehr Download PDF EPUB FB2

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Access the full text. The Comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in south Florida. By David S. Maehr.

Abstract (Bibliography) Includes bibliographical references (p. ).(Statement of Responsibility) David Steffen Maehr. The comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in south Florida - Detail - Ermes. for descriptions of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther habitat use and home range composition.

Several of the communities that were described by Davis () were combined in order to match a current observer's ability to correctly identify plant communities from m elevation in a fixed-wing aircraft. Buy The comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in south Florida (Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History) by David S Maehr (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : David S Maehr. The comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in. amount of forest required by panthers to survive in South Florida, USA.

They considered a hypothetical panther. Hunting activities can affect game species in several ways; however, indirect effects of hunting on non‐game species have received less attention than direct effects on game species, even though such.

The comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in south Fl orida. Bulletin of. the Florida Museum of Natural Hist ory – Erickson, W.

THE TIVE ECOLOGY OF, BLACK BEAR, AND FLORIDA ANTHER IN SOUTH FLORIDA David Steffen Maehri ABSTRACT Comparisons of food habits, habitat use, and movements revealed a low probability for competitive interactions among bobcat ynx ndia).

Florida panther (Puma concotor cooi1 and black bear (Urns amencanus) in South Florida. Unlike the bobcat, the Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi), a subspecies of puma, is protected under the Endangered Species Act.

It is extremely rare to spot a panther in the wild in Florida, as fewer than of them exist across the state with the majority living in south Florida. A spatially-explicit individual-based simulation model for Florida panther and white-tailed deer in the Everglades and Big Cypress landscapes.

Pages in D. Jordan, editor. Proceedings of the Florida Panther Conference. (Fort Myers, Florida, USA). U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Gainesville, Florida. Request PDF | Do prescribed fires in South Florida reduce habitat quality for native carnivores. | Prescribed fire, as a management tool, is unquestionably vital to the maintenance of natural.

The comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in South Florida. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History Maehr, D.

The Florida panther: life and death of a vanishing Press, Covelo, California, USA. The comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in South Florida.

Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History Maehr, D. The Florida panther: life and death of a vanishing carnivore. Island Press, Covelo, California, USA. D.S. MaehrThe comparative ecology of bobcat, black bear, and Florida panther in south Florida Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History, 40 (), pp.

Google Scholar.The historic range of the Florida black bear, Florida panther, bobcat, and white tail deer used to include hammocks, but most of the animals of the hammocks were smaller. Hammock wildlife is not rare, but is difficult to see.Florida Black Bear Management Plan.

The update to the state’s comprehensive Florida Black Bear Management Plan was approved by the FWC Commissioners at the December meeting. The plan provides a statewide framework for actions needed to ensure the long-term survival of bears and address bear management challenges.